LBAMspray.com
 LBAMspray.info

Defending the Central Coast from
BioChemical Aerial Spraying

Intro to LBAM

Donate

CASS Website

File Illness Report

 
Images

Main Menu


Home


Calendar of Events


Intro to LBAM


Sign Petition


Audio & Video


Reports


CDFA Data


CEQA


Health Info


Spray Safety


Court Cases


Legal


USDA


EPA


Take Action


Flyers


Archive


Image Archives


Links


Contact Us


Join Email List


 


Obama sells out the people again with his pick of Lisa Jackson as head of the EPA.


Photos form the Golden Gate Bridge Walk May 31, 2008


Raw untouched picture of the red tide just after the November 2007 aerial spray when moth spray entered the bay waters of Santa Cruz Ca.





Splat / Goo biochemical pesticide




Wasp release 1 Million per sq Mile
Map of release zones


Twist ties


Sticky Traps:


Dynamic Avaiation



"Findings released Friday by the Department of Pesticide Regulation suggest that exposure
to a high dose of airborne CheckMate microcapsule particles could cause eye,
skin or respiratory irritation. "..."Monterey County Agricultural Commissioner Eric Lauritzen fined Dynamic Aviation $690 for spraying areas that should not have been sprayed."
-Daniel Lopez Herald Staff Writer 11/17/2007









Ag Kawamura- CDFA, Nancy Lungren CDFA


Helene Wright USDA






SC City Attorney







       








Study absolves CheckMate of spray illness Study absolves CheckMate of spray illness.
Low-grade exposure unlikely to be harmful, report finds
By DANIEL LOPEZ
Herald Staff Writer

Illnesses reported by Peninsula residents after September's spraying to combat the light brown apple moth likely weren't caused by CheckMate products, according to the findings of a study released Friday.

A review of the toxicity of the CheckMate products by the state Department of Pesticide Regulation, the California Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Public Health was prompted by complaints of illness by residents after the spraying Sept. 9 to Sept. 12.

Coughs, sore throats, runny noses, congestion, headaches, shortness of breath, muscle aches, diarrhea, fatigue and itchy eyes, noses and throats were reported by about 120 people.

The study did not examine each case individually.

Findings released Friday by the Department of Pesticide Regulation suggest that exposure to a high dose of airborne CheckMate microcapsule particles could cause eye, skin or respiratory irritation.

But the report said that the application of the product over Monterey County was extremely low, and it is unlikely the low levels could result in health problems.

The application of pheromones that took place was done at rates that fell below the proposed rate of 20 grams of active ingredient per acre, the report states.

"Most reported symptoms are consistent with inhalation of a nonspecific irritant material, but because they are also consistent with other possible causes, it is not possible to confirm the symptoms are or are not due to the application of

CheckMate," the report states.

The study states that the microcapsule particles are very large by inhalation standards, 25 micrometers in diameter or larger, and unable to reach the deep lung.

Among the recommendations the report makes to the state Department of Food and Agriculture, which is heading up the eradication effort, is to consider conducting air sampling to investigate the contribution of the aerially released microcapsule particles to the atmosphere.

On Friday, Monterey County Agricultural Commissioner Eric Lauritzen fined Dynamic Aviation $690 for spraying areas that should not have been sprayed.

Pilots for Dynamic Aviation, the company contracted by the state to perform the spraying, were found to have sprayed pheromones outside the work zone four times during the operation over the Peninsula in October.

The violations occurred Oct. 24 for 47 seconds and Oct. 25 for 19 seconds, when the pilot failed to shut off the spray equipment when the airplane reached the eastern edge of the spray zone, in the area of Monterey Ranch Road and Canada Vista Way south of Monterey-Salinas Highway.

On Oct. 26, for a 12-second period, a pilot failed to shut off the spray equipment when he reached the northern boundary of the application zone north of Marina.

That night, a different airplane experienced a malfunction with its navigation system and allowed spray to be applied for three seconds in the same area north of Marina.

"While it is clear that these incidents did not present a threat to public health or the environment, I want to emphasize that pesticide law applies to everyone and compliance with the law is essential," Lauritzen said about issuing the fine.

State agricultural officials discovered the errors when they conducted an internal audit of spraying operations.

Two similar incidents in September discovered through the audit remain under investigation, Lauritzen said.

Daniel Lopez can be reached at 646-4494 or dlopez@montereyherald.com





 

  
Search this website!
Powered by Google.

Heads Up!


 

© 2007-2008 LBAMspray.com, LBAMspray.info - All Rights Reserved